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K-12 Education

We are committed to generating and synthesizing research on key civil rights and equal opportunity policies that have been neglected or overlooked.

Well before the passing of the "Leave No Child Behind" Act of 2002, which renewed the nation's interest in K-12 education, The Civil Rights Project had been focused on critical issues affecting this country's elementary and secondary students. CRP believes that equal educational opportunity is a necessary prerequisite to equal educational outcomes. Further, CRP believes that all students benefit from ethnically diverse educational experiences. For the past several years, a main focus of our research has been to demonstrate concrete educational benefits derived from attending diverse elementary and secondary schools. Research in the area of K-12 Education has been extensive with the hopes of having a broad impact nation-wide.

Our current research interests related to K-12 education include:

 

Recent K-12 Research

 

Research Item Diversity in the Distance: The Onset of Racial Change in Northern New England Schools
Northern New England, comprised of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, has the opportunity to plan carefully and intentionally so that the region is not plagued by problems of segregation and can instead benefit from the impending racial change and increased diversity to create and sustain diverse learning environments.
Research Item Nation-wide Survey of State Education Agencies’ Online School Disciplinary Data for Students with Disabilities (Summer 2014)
School Disciplinary Data reported by SEAs online.
Research Item Keeping California's Kids in School
This report compares this year’s data release covering 2012-13 to the data released last year covering 2011-12. We find a reduction in the use of out-of-school suspension for every racial/ethnic group.
Research Item Brown at 60: Great Progress, a Long Retreat and an Uncertain Future
Marking the 60th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v Board of Education, the UCLA’s Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles assessed the nation's progress in addressing school segregation, and found that--contrary to many claims--the South has not gone back to the level of segregation before Brown. It has, however, lost all of the additional progress made after l967, but is still the least segregated region for black students. New statistics show a vast transformation of the nation’s school population since the civil rights era. The authors reveal that Latinos are significantly more segregated than blacks in suburban America.
Research Item Segregation Again: North Carolina’s Transition from Leading Desegregation Then to Accepting Segregation Now
This report investigates trends in school segregation in North Carolina over the last two decades by examining measures of concentration, exposure, and evenness by both race and class. After exploring the overall enrollment patterns and segregation trends at the state level, this report turns to three major metropolitan areas within the state—Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, Raleigh-Cary, and Greensboro-High Point—to analyze similar measures of segregation for each metropolitan area.
Research Item Segregating California’s Future: Inequality and its Alternative 60 Years after Brown v. Board of Education
Marking the 60th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v Board of Education, CRP researchers assessed California's progress in addressing school segregation, and found that California students are more racially segregated than ever. The authors conclude that California is the third worst state when it comes to school segregation for African Americans, behind New York and Illinois. California is, however, the state in which Latino students are most segregated.
Research Item New York State’s Extreme School Segregation: Inequality, Inaction and a Damaged Future
New York has the most segregated schools in the country: in 2009, black and Latino students in the state had the highest concentration in intensely-segregated public schools (less than 10% white enrollment), the lowest exposure to white students, and the most uneven distribution with white students across schools. Heavily impacting these state rankings is New York City, home to the largest and one of the most segregated public school systems in the nation.
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