Personal tools
You are here: Home Research Metro and Regional Inequalities

Metro and Regional Inequalities

Research in this section focuses attention on the structure of economic and social opportunities created by the intersection of metropolitan and regional housing, education, transportation, growth, workforce and other policies, all within a context of often dramatic demographic changes.

The challenges to creating and implementing an anti-discrimination agenda call for a renewed, creative agenda that recognizes the structural, multi-layered impediments to opportunities faced in minority communities. The most obvious, although often overlooked, is the interrelationship between housing and schools, especially residential segregation by class and race. Other topics are less familiar, such as the relationship between racial justice and "smart growth," or racial justice evaluations of metropolitan transportation planning.

 

Recent Metro and Regional Inequalities Research

Research Item The Growth of Segregation in American Schools: Changing Patterns of Separation and Poverty Since 1968
Southern segregation grew significantly from 1988 to 1991 and segregation of African-American students across the U.S. also increased. This study provides national data that shows the relationship of segregation to poverty and where segregation is either concentrated or remains highly integrated. This report also explores the way in which a state's pattern of school district organization relates to the segregation of its students after the Supreme Court's 1974 decision in the Detroit case, Milliken v. Bradley.
Document Actions

Copyright © 2010 UC Regents