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Closing the School Discipline Gap: Equitable Remedies for Excessive Exclusion

Date Published: January 24, 2015

Daniel Losen of the The Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the UCLA Civil Rights Project (CRP/CCRR) looks at disciplinary policies and practices in school that result in disparities, and provides remedies that may be enacted at federal, state, and district levels.

Closing The School Discipline Gap CoverClosing the School Discipline Gap: Equitable Remedies for Excessive Exclusion, edited by Daniel Losen of The Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the UCLA Civil Rights Project (CRP/CCRR), looks at disciplinary policies and practices in school that result in disparities, and provides remedies that may be enacted at federal, state, and district levels. Educators remove over 3.45 million students from school annually for disciplinary reasons, despite strong evidence that school suspension policies are harmful to students. The research presented in this volume demonstrates that disciplinary policies and practices that schools control directly exacerbate today's profound inequities in educational opportunity and outcomes. Part I explores how suspensions flow along the lines of race, gender, and disability status. Part II examines potential remedies that show great promise, including a district-wide approach in Cleveland, Ohio, aimed at social and emotional learning strategies.

“Closing the School Discipline Gap can make an enormous difference in reducing disciplinary exclusions across the country.  This book not only exposes unsound practices and their disparate impact on the historically disadvantaged, but provides educators, policymakers, and community advocates with an array of remedies that are proven effective or hold great promise.  Educators, communities, and students alike can benefit from the promising interventions and well-grounded recommendations.”

—Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education, Stanford University

Closing the School Discipline Gap, published by Teachers College Press, is a call for action in an area where public schools can and should make powerful improvements, in a relatively short period of time.

Book Features:

  • Shows the academic and social costs of excessive disciplinary exclusion.
  • Examines school policies and practices that lead generations of African-American and Latino youth into the school-to-prison pipeline.
  • Offers evidence-based interventions for reducing excessive and disparate out-of-school suspensions.
  • Connects research to real changes that can be made to federal, state, and district policies.

Contributors include: Robert Balfanz, Jamilia Blake, Dewey Cornell, Jeremy D. Finn, Thalia González, Anne Gregory, Daniel J. Losen, David M. Osher, Russell J. Skiba, Ivory A. Toldson

Closing the School Discipline Gap: Equitable Remedies for Excessive Exclusion may be purchased from the Civil Rights Project or at Teachers College Press. 

For a limited time, your tax-deductible donation of $100 or more to the Civil Rights Project will be rewarded with a copy of Closing the School Discipline Gap (supplies limited).

You can donate on-line or send a check payable to "UC Regents" to: 

UCLA Civil Rights Project, 3323 Moore Hall, Box 951521, Los Angeles, CA 90095.

 

About the Center for Civil Rights Remedies

The Center for Civil Rights Remedies (CCRR) is an initiative at the UCLA Civil Rights Project that began in the summer of 2011. The CCRR Remedies is dedicated to improving educational opportunities and outcomes for children from subgroups who have been discriminated against historically due to their race/ethnicity, and who are frequently subjected to exclusionary practices such as disciplinary removal, over-representation in special education, and reduced access to a college-bound curriculum. Special projects on the School-to-Prison Pipeline and Racial Inequity in Special Education are supported by the Atlantic Philanthropies and The California Endowment and carried out in collaboration with several partner organizations.



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