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Metro and Regional Inequalities

Research in this section focuses attention on the structure of economic and social opportunities created by the intersection of metropolitan and regional housing, education, transportation, growth, workforce and other policies, all within a context of often dramatic demographic changes.

The challenges to creating and implementing an anti-discrimination agenda call for a renewed, creative agenda that recognizes the structural, multi-layered impediments to opportunities faced in minority communities. The most obvious, although often overlooked, is the interrelationship between housing and schools, especially residential segregation by class and race. Other topics are less familiar, such as the relationship between racial justice and "smart growth," or racial justice evaluations of metropolitan transportation planning.


Recent Metro and Regional Inequalities Research

Research Item The Baccalaureate in the California Community College: Current Challenges & Future Prospects
This report considers the experiences with community college baccalaureate programs of three states that are demographically similar to California, and offers a set of recommendations that could help California achieve both workforce readiness and greater equity of opportunity to complete a baccalaureate degree for underrepresented students.
Research Item Realizing the Economic Advantages of a Multilingual Workforce
As markets have transitioned from agricultural to industrial to what is now the information age, there are tremendous opportunities for those who can analyze, collaborate, and communicate with people all over the world while providing services in the local language of the client. These workers can compete for work in their home markets and in markets where their language fluency puts them at an advantage over those with only monolingual skills—like many in the American workforce.
Research Item Fulfilling America’s Future: Latinas in the U.S., 2015
At 54 million, Hispanics now make up the largest ethnic minority in the country. Currently, Hispanic girls and women are one in five women in the U.S. and will comprise nearly one third of the country’s female population by 2060. Ensuring they are positioned for success is a fundamental responsibility and an important economic opportunity for the country.
Research Item New York State’s Extreme School Segregation: Inequality, Inaction and a Damaged Future
New York has the most segregated schools in the country: in 2009, black and Latino students in the state had the highest concentration in intensely-segregated public schools (less than 10% white enrollment), the lowest exposure to white students, and the most uneven distribution with white students across schools. Heavily impacting these state rankings is New York City, home to the largest and one of the most segregated public school systems in the nation.
Research Item The Resegregation of Suburban Schools: A Hidden Crisis in American Education
Erica Frankenberg is an assistant professor in the department of education policy studies in the College of Education at the Pennsylvania State University. Gary Orfield is a professor of education, law, political science and urban planning, and codirector of the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Research Item The Lasanti Project Description
CRP's LASANTI Project explores many dimensions of social and economic change and inequality across the huge bi-national urbanized complex, stretching from the northern Los Angeles suburbs down through San Diego to the Tijuana metropolitan area.
Research Item Metro Boston Equity Initiative
The Metropolitan Boston Equity Initiative investigates racial change and the implications of such change for social and economic opportunity within the region’s diverse population.
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