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About the Series: A Civil Rights Agenda for the Next Quarter Century

Date Published: February 21, 2022

In commemoration of its 25th Anniversary, the CRP has launched two large sets of commissioned work. The first is a series on the potential for social change and equity policies in the nation. The second set of studies focuses on California, a vast state whose astonishing diversity foretells the future of the U.S. and whose profound inequality warns that there is much work to be done.

About the Series

A Civil Rights Agenda for the Next Quarter Century

 

The Civil Rights Project was founded in 1996 at Harvard University, during a period of increasingly conservative courts and political movements that were limiting, and sometimes reversing, major civil rights reforms. In 2007 the Project moved to UCLA. Its goal was—and still is—to bring together researchers, lawyers, civil rights advocates and governmental and educational leaders to create a new generation of civil rights research, and communicate what is learned to those who could use it to address the problems of inequality and discrimination. Created a generation after the civil rights revolution of the 1960s, CRP’s vision was to produce new understandings of challenges and research-based evidence on solutions. The Project has always maintained a strong, central focus on equal education and racial change.

We are celebrating our first quarter century by taking a serious look forward—not at the history of the issues, not at the debates over older policies, not at celebrating prior victories but at the needs of the next quarter century. Since the work of civil rights advocates and leaders of color in recent decades has often been about defending threatened, existing rights, we need innovative thinking to address the challenges facing our rapidly changing society. Political leaders often see policy in short two- and four-year election cycles but we decided to look at the upcoming generation. Because researchers are uniquely qualified to think systematically, this series is an attempt to harness the skills of several disciplines, to think deeply about how our society has changed since the civil rights revolution and what the implications are for the future of racial justice.

This effort includes two very large sets of newly commissioned work. The first is a series on the potential for social change and equity policies in the nation. The second set of studies focuses on California, a vast state whose astonishing diversity foretells the future of the U.S. and whose profound inequality warns that there is much work to be done. All these studies will initially be issued as working papers. They will be brought together in statewide conferences and in the U.S. Capitol and, eventually, as two major books, which we hope will help light the way in the coming decades. At each of the major events, scholars will exchange ideas and address questions from each other, from leaders and from the public.

The Civil Rights Project, like the country, is in a period of transition, identifying leadership for its next chapter. We are fortunate to have collaborated with a remarkable network of important scholars across the U.S., who contributed to our work in the last quarter century and continue to do so in this new work. We are also inspired by the nation’s many young people who understand that our future depends on overcoming division. They are committed to constructing new paths to racial justice. We hope these studies open avenues for this critical work, stimulate future scholars and lawyers, and inform policymaking in a society with the unlimited potential of diversity, if it can only figure out how to achieve genuine equality. 

-Gary Orfield and Patricia Gándara

Co-directors, UCLA Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles

 
 

PAPERS IN THE SERIES

 
 SERIES 1:  NATIONAL

The Role of Standardized Tests in College Admissions,” by Rebecca Zwick, June 8, 2023
 
 “Bilingual Education and America’s Future: Evidence and Pathways,” by Lorna Porter, Manuel Chavez Cano and Ilana Umansky, June 15, 2023
 
 

"Racial Reckoning and the Role of Schooling:  Exploring the Potential of Integrated Classrooms and Liberatory Pedagogies," by Suneal Kolluri, Liane I. Hypolite, Alexis Patterson, Kimberly Young, September 27, 2023

"The Changing Racial and Ethnic Composition of the School-Age Population in the U.S.," by Jennifer Van Hook, Alain Bélanger, Patrick Sabourin and Nicolas Patoine Hamel, November 30, 2023

"American Indian and Alaska Native Populations: Envisioning the Future," by Carolyn A. Liebler, November 30, 2023

Understanding Suburban School Segregation: Toward a Renewed Civil Rights Agenda,” by Erica Frankenberg and Genevieve Siegel Hawley, February 22, 2024




SERIES 2:  CALIFORNIA

The Potential of California’s Community College Baccalaureate for Closing Racial Equity Gaps,” by Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, Marcela G. Cuéllar, Nidia Bañuelos, Austin Lyke, Davis Vo, April 6, 2023 

"Gentrification and Schools:  Challenges, Opportunities and Policy Options,”  by Kfir Mordechay, David Mickey-Pabelloand Jennifer B. Ayscue, November 15,2023.

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