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K-12 Education

We are committed to generating and synthesizing research on key civil rights and equal opportunity policies that have been neglected or overlooked.

Well before the passing of the "Leave No Child Behind" Act of 2002, which renewed the nation's interest in K-12 education, The Civil Rights Project had been focused on critical issues affecting this country's elementary and secondary students. CRP believes that equal educational opportunity is a necessary prerequisite to equal educational outcomes. Further, CRP believes that all students benefit from ethnically diverse educational experiences. For the past several years, a main focus of our research has been to demonstrate concrete educational benefits derived from attending diverse elementary and secondary schools. Research in the area of K-12 Education has been extensive with the hopes of having a broad impact nation-wide.

Our current research interests related to K-12 education include:

 

Recent K-12 Research

 

Research Item Summary Report: Confronting the Equity Issues in Dual Language Immersion Programs
This report is a summary of the papers presented and issues discussed during the 2018 Forum on Equity and Dual Language Education, held at UCLA on December 7-8, 2018.
Research Item The State of Dual Language Education in the U.S. in the Context of Equity and Social Justice
This paper attempts to lay a foundation for the discussion of equity issues in dual language immersion education by summarizing some of the more recent research (and identifying some critical gaps) that might inform our understanding of these issues.
Research Item Dual Language Program Planning and Equity
DLI programs are sometimes viewed as “magic,” with the assumption that any DLI program will result in the outcomes well documented in the literature. Yet, DLI programs require considerable planning in order to equitably meet the goals of all students in a DLI program.
Research Item The Striking Outlier: The Persistent, Painful and Problematic Practice of Corporal Punishment in Schools
This report examines only the data (students populations and paddling incidents) from schools where corporal punishment is used. The report relies on data from the U.S. Department of Education's Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), primarily from the 2013-14 school year. In schools where corporal punishment is practiced, black students and students with disabilities are more likely to be struck than white students and those without disabilities.
Research Item Harming Our Common Future: America's Segregated Schools 65 Years after Brown
The publication of this report marks the 65th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case declaring racial segregation in public schools unconstitutional. There have been many changes since the ruling, but intense levels of segregation—which had decreased markedly after 1954 for black students—are on the rise once again. White and Latino students are the most segregated groups.
Research Item School Integration in Gentrifying Neighborhoods: Evidence from New York City
In gentrifying areas of New York City, this research finds that a small but growing segment of middle-class, mostly White families is choosing to enroll their children in their neighborhood public elementary schools, thus increasing the diversity in those schools. Because residential and school segregation across the nation have traditionally had a symbiotic relationship where an increase in one leads to an increase in the other, the demographic phenomenon associated with gentrification where neighborhoods become more diverse has the potential to alleviate persistent school segregation, a major cause of educational inequity.
Research Item Asian Americans and Race-Conscious Admissions: Understanding the Conservative Opposition’s Strategy of Misinformation, Intimidation & Racial Division
This report examines the current wave of attacks against race-conscious policies in postsecondary admissions (or affirmative action as the policy is more commonly termed), focuses specifically on the roles that Asian Americans have come to play, both unwillingly and willingly, in opposition efforts, and presents new research on Asian Americans’ support for affirmative action.
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