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Integration and Diversity

Research in this section explores the impacts and benefits of racial and ethnic diversity in education, as well as resegregation trends and remedies in our nation's public schools.

Related publication: The Integration Report - a monthly bulletin focusing on school integration throughout the nation

Recent Integration and Diversity Research


Research Item Fulfilling America’s Future: Latinas in the U.S., 2015
At 54 million, Hispanics now make up the largest ethnic minority in the country. Currently, Hispanic girls and women are one in five women in the U.S. and will comprise nearly one third of the country’s female population by 2060. Ensuring they are positioned for success is a fundamental responsibility and an important economic opportunity for the country.
Research Item Better Choices for Buffalo's Students: Expanding & Reforming the Criteria Schools System
This research was funded by a contract from the Buffalo Public Schools as part of an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. It represents our independent judgment on the issues addressed in the OCR investigation and agreement with the Buffalo Public Schools. This report examines educational opportunity in Buffalo’s system of criteria-based schools of choice, which offer their admitted students special opportunities not available in the regular schools.
Research Item Connecticut School Integration: Moving Forward as the Northeast Retreats
Looking at the grim picture of central city Hartford and Bridgeport when desegregation efforts began and considering the odds against the creation of new models in a time when civil rights were shrinking, what has been accomplished in Connecticut is a victory over great odds. It is also an example of the way there can be change that expands the possibilities for all and enriches the communities.
Research Item Is Opportunity Knocking or Slipping Away? Racial Diversity and Segregation in Pennsylvania
As a slow-growth increasingly diverse state with an aging population, Pennsylvania needs to think hard about its continued passive acceptance of segregated and inferior schooling, and about the spread of destructive racial patterns from urban areas into growing sectors of suburbia and small cities.
Research Item Diversity in the Distance: The Onset of Racial Change in Northern New England Schools
Northern New England, comprised of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, has the opportunity to plan carefully and intentionally so that the region is not plagued by problems of segregation and can instead benefit from the impending racial change and increased diversity to create and sustain diverse learning environments.
Research Item Brown at 60: Great Progress, a Long Retreat and an Uncertain Future
Marking the 60th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brown v Board of Education, the UCLA’s Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles assessed the nation's progress in addressing school segregation, and found that--contrary to many claims--the South has not gone back to the level of segregation before Brown. It has, however, lost all of the additional progress made after l967, but is still the least segregated region for black students. New statistics show a vast transformation of the nation’s school population since the civil rights era. The authors reveal that Latinos are significantly more segregated than blacks in suburban America.
Research Item Segregation Again: North Carolina’s Transition from Leading Desegregation Then to Accepting Segregation Now
This report investigates trends in school segregation in North Carolina over the last two decades by examining measures of concentration, exposure, and evenness by both race and class. After exploring the overall enrollment patterns and segregation trends at the state level, this report turns to three major metropolitan areas within the state—Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, Raleigh-Cary, and Greensboro-High Point—to analyze similar measures of segregation for each metropolitan area.
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